Hope House: Committed to Restoration Through Microfinance

09/07/2021 Washington, D.C. (International Christian Concern) – “Around 10 years ago, my brother and I were manufacturing shoes to sell, but after the people tended to buy ready-to-wear shoes, we changed the business from manufacturing shoes to selling them.”

Reda is an Egyptian Christian who is married with two children and lives with his family and his brother’s family. The whole family lives in one of the villages where Hope House operates. In an effort to combat the generational and cyclical persecution that affects many poorer, Egyptian Christians, International Christian Concern (ICC) launched Hope House. The center focuses on the education of Christian children, who often face discrimination in the public school system. Reda’s daughter Sandy has been a participant in Hope House’s child sponsorship program for over two years now.

Though the focus is on children, ICC seeks to equip whole families. Hope House provides microfinance loans to those who have a proven record to sustain or develop a new business. Reda and his brother qualified for a loan last year and wrapped up their business development this past month.

“I used to go to Cairo and buy shoes, but we needed to rebuild our house again, which cost a lot of our savings. Once we got the loan, we bought a different collection of goods that we did not buy before, including expensive and cheaper shoes. We have a varied collection of goods right now,” said Reda.

“This loan was a vast difference for me; I had only a little money and after I got the loan, I have bought another tricycle to tour the villages. I have not faced any difficulties to pay the loan installments over the last 10 months, I sell good quantities. This loan was a good push, I get a good profit and I continue so well."

“This loan was a vast difference for me; I had only a little money and after I got the loan, I have bought another tricycle to tour the villages. I have not faced any difficulties to pay the loan installments over the last 10 months, I sell good quantities. This loan was a good push, I get a good profit and I continue so well,” he continued.

“I decided to be a salesman rather than be the person who sells goods from his house. Touring the villages allows me to meet so many buyers. If I sell goods at my house, probably I will sell only 6 to 8 shoes per day,” Reda concluded.

After receiving the microfinance loan, Reda and his whole family are able to better provide for themselves. The investment that Hope House has made in Reda and his daughter Sandy empowers the family to combat the common effects of generational persecution that leaves Christians at the bottom of the social ladder without access to quality opportunities.

For interviews please contact Adison Parker: press@persecution.org

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