ISIS Message Written on Walls of Mosul Monastery Warn Christians of Militants’ Presence

ICC Note:

Written on the walls of St. George’s Monastery in Mosul are the words “the Islamic State will always stay in Iraq.” When one walks through the streets of Mosul, and other areas of the Nineveh Plains, evidence of ISIS’s hatred towards Christianity is everywhere. The militants’ graffiti mark the walls of destroyed churches, the words a reminder that ISIS’s military defeat does not mean that Christians are safe in Iraq. For this reason, many Christians are filled with uncertainty about their future, making it difficult for families to make any long term plans.  

 

02/01/2018 Iraq (Religion Libertad) –    Lemons, grapefruits, oranges and figs grow abundantly in the three orchards that belong to the house of Nadia Younis Butti in Mosul. It is the house that his parents built a new plant. He always enjoyed the lush fruit trees and seductive fruit when he sat on the swing, surrounded by fragrant blooming shrubs. However, on July 17, 2014, Nadia had to leave her home in Mosul. ISIS had occupied the city: “I left with all the pain in my heart.”

After the liberation of Mosul, last summer, Nadia has now returned to her hometown. “It is still extremely dangerous to live in Mosul,” Nadia sighs. I just spoke with a policeman who has lost a comrade, this week, near the convent of St. Georg. He was murdered by nochand. For three years, many inhabitants of Mosul have collaborated with the jihadists. In some families there may be family members, or relatives, who belonged to the Islamic State. There are many Sunnis who have frequently supported the EI. The city has been liberated by the Iraqi army, which in turn is supported by numerous Iranian Shiites. In Mosul they met with much distrust: they do not see them as allies. For me, the city has not become safe since its reconquest. ”

“The Islamic State will always stay in Iraq”; A jihadist wrote in black letters on one of the walls of the famous monastery of St. Georg(Mar Gurguis) from Mosul. The Assyrian Nadia Younis Butti reflects on those words, while contemplating the remains of the famous monastery, completely destroyed by the extremists.

Lemons, grapefruits, oranges and figs grow abundantly in the three orchards that belong to the house of Nadia Younis Butti in Mosul. It is the house that his parents built a new plant. He always enjoyed the lush fruit trees and seductive fruit when he sat on the swing, surrounded by fragrant blooming shrubs. However, on July 17, 2014, Nadia had to leave her home in Mosul. ISIS had occupied the city: “I left with all the pain in my heart.”

After the liberation of Mosul, last summer, Nadia has now returned to her hometown. “It is still extremely dangerous to live in Mosul,” Nadia sighs. I just spoke with a policeman who has lost a comrade, this week, near the convent of St. Georg. He was murdered by nochand. For three years, many inhabitants of Mosul have collaborated with the jihadists. In some families there may be family members, or relatives, who belonged to the Islamic State. There are many Sunnis who have frequently supported the EI. The city has been liberated by the Iraqi army, which in turn is supported by numerous Iranian Shiites. In Mosul they met with much distrust: they do not see them as allies. For me, the city has not become safe since its reconquest. ”

“The Islamic State will always stay in Iraq”; A jihadist wrote in black letters on one of the walls of the famous monastery of St. Georg(Mar Gurguis) from Mosul. The Assyrian Nadia Younis Butti reflects on those words, while contemplating the remains of the famous monastery, completely destroyed by the extremists.

The passage of terrorists is very visible in the whole area of ​​the Nineveh plain / Jaco Klamer (ACN)

“Every spring and every autumnal gathered here, for three days, faithful and Christian monks,” he says. There were activities and we could stay to sleep here. I remember with great joy that time without worries ».

Also Yohanna Youssef Towaya has many beautiful memories of that time when Christians could meet freely in the monastery of St. Georg, dating from the seventeenth century. And Ohanna worked as a professor at the University of Mosul and lived in the city. However, when the University acquired a building in Qaraqosh, he moved to that Christian city on the Nineveh plain.

With Nadia she observes the dome, now inclined, and walks through the impressive corridors of the monastery, where the marvelous marble plates of the floor, the walls and the arches have been torn away. The jihadists had no respect even of the altar: it was destroyed. The marble plates were stolen; only fragments of them are scattered throughout the building. In an alcove stands an 800-year-old statue; She was decapitated.

[Full Story]

For interviews with Claire Evans, ICC’s Regional Manager, please contact Olivia Miller, Communications Coordinator: press@persecution.org

ICC is on a mission to help persecuted Christians. Will you join us?