Giving hope to persecuted Christians since 1995
Select Page

ICC Note:

Fox news ran a special article on how Christians survive and operate in the country ranked as most oppressive to Christianity – North Korea. Several non-governmental organizations working closely with North Korea share in this article how Christians practice their faith and the risks associated with that.

08/20/2017 North Korea (Fox News) – For 16 years, North Korea has been ranked the “most oppressive place in the world for Christians,” and this week the U.S. State Department re-asserted it as one of the world’s worst religious persecutors – torturing and executing those even suspected of worshipping God. But that still hasn’t stopped an estimated 36 percent of the population – around 9 million – from practicing Christianity.

“Life is extremely difficult for all North Koreans, but Christians face an even tougher road,” Jeff King, president of International Christian Concern told Fox News.

“Christians are accused of being imperialists seeking to overthrow the government and those who are caught practicing their faith are arrested, horrendously tortured, imprisoned and [sometimes] immediately put to death.”

So how do these brave devotees do it in the most closed country on earth?

On the surface, Christianity does exist in North Korea. Its constitution on paper vows to protect religious freedom and forbids discrimination based on one’s faith. Thus, the capital, Pyongyang, is currently host to five state-controlled churches – the Protestant Bongsu, Chilgol and Jeil Churches, the Catholic Jangchung Cathedral and the most recent being the Orthodox Holy Trinity Russian Church. Yet all are deemed to be little more than fraudulent showpieces for visiting officials and tourists

[Full Story]

 

ICC Note:

Fox news ran a special article on how Christians survive and operate in the country ranked as most oppressive to Christianity – North Korea. Several non-governmental organizations working closely with North Korea share in this article how Christians practice their faith and the risks associated with that.

 

08/20/2017 North Korea (Fox News) – For 16 years, North Korea has been ranked the “most oppressive place in the world for Christians,” and this week the U.S. State Department re-asserted it as one of the world’s worst religious persecutors – torturing and executing those even suspected of worshipping God. But that still hasn’t stopped an estimated 36 percent of the population – around 9 million – from practicing Christianity.

 

Life is extremely difficult for all North Koreans, but Christians face an even tougher road,” Jeff King, president of International Christian Concern told Fox News.

 

Christians are accused of being imperialists seeking to overthrow the government and those who are caught practicing their faith are arrested, horrendously tortured, imprisoned and [sometimes] immediately put to death.”

 

So how do these brave devotees do it in the most closed country on earth?

 

On the surface, Christianity does exist in North Korea. Its constitution on paper vows to protect religious freedom and forbids discrimination based on one’s faith. Thus, the capital, Pyongyang, is currently host to five state-controlled churches – the Protestant Bongsu, Chilgol and Jeil Churches, the Catholic Jangchung Cathedral and the most recent being the Orthodox Holy Trinity Russian Church. Yet all are deemed to be little more than fraudulent showpieces for visiting officials and tourists

 

 

[Full Story]