Giving hope to persecuted Christians since 1995
Select Page

 ICC Note: Recent reports indicate that the Séléka islamists are drafting child soldiers to aid in their campaign against CAR’s Christians. The situation has become one of the world’s worst humanitarian disasters. This article from The Guardian vividly presents some of the many personal horror stories visited upon the Christians in this country. Please pray for them, for the world to intervene, and for their tormentors.
11/25/2013 Central African Republic (The Guardian) – A massacre of the innocents is taking place in the heart of Africa as the world looks the other way.
One man describes how his four-year-old son’s throat was slit, and how he saw a snake swallowing a baby. A woman explains that she is caring for a young girl because her mother went searching for medicine and was bludgeoned to death with Kalashnikov rifles. A young man tells how he was bound and thrown to the crocodiles, but managed to swim to safety.
This is the world of horrors that the Central African Republic (CAR) has become. Thousands of people are dying at the hands of soldiers and militia gangs or from untreated diseases such as malaria. Boys and girls as young as eight are pressganged into fighting between Christians and Muslims. There are reports of beheadings and public execution-style killings. Villages are razed to the ground.
Never much more than a phantom state, the CAR has sucked in thousands of mercenaries from neighbouring countries and, France warned on Thursday, now stands “on the verge of genocide”. Yet many would struggle to find the country on a map, despite the clue in its afterthought name…
Everyone here has a sad story to tell. Zita Nganamodei, 26, has a baby girl tied to her back who is not her own. Yesterday, she says, her neighbour, Josephine Kolefei, brought the baby for medical treatment without realising she was crossing an arbitrary boundary that the Seleka had just imposed. The 35-year-old was beaten with a Kalashnikov and taken to hospital, where she died. “I went to site and found the baby on the ground,” says Nganamodei, who has two children of her own. “I brought her to the hospital to be treated.”
She says she will now take care of the girl, 18-month-old Arethas Demba, but will one day have to explain how her mother died. “I do not know why they had to kill her. I ask that justice be done for this killing. I don’t know what will happen in the future if these killings continue.”
Meanwhile a 35-year-old first aid worker who wants to be known as Papa Romeo claims that, on 8 November in the village of Bombi Te, the Seleka were outrun by motorcyclists carrying weapons and took revenge on the population. “My wife was in the field with our four-year-old, Richide,” he says. “The Seleka took her money and gold and told her to leave and not come back.
“They started to attack my son. They tried to shoot him but the gun was not working. So they slit his throat instead. What threat does this child pose to the Seleka? He is just a child. My heart is right here: if Michel Djotodia was here, my heart would destroy him.”

[FULL STORY]