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UZBEKISTAN: State tries to take one children’s summer camp, raids another
ICC Note:
Four buses, full of 80 officials and police stormed into a Christian summer camp “brandishing batons” and took the nine adults and 22 children into custody. They separated the children from their parents and questioned them for six hours. After confiscating their belongings and releasing them, police raided the private homes of the Christian camp organizers. The Christians are awaiting their punishment for practicing their right to religious freedom.
By Mushfig Bayram
8/9/2013 Uzbekistan (Forum 18)- On 23 July in Samarkand Region, police raided a children’s camp in the village of Mironkul organised by local Protestants, a Protestant who wished to remain unnamed for fear of state reprisals told Forum 18 on 6 August. “Four full buses with 80 officials and police, 30 of whom wore police uniforms and 20 in black OMON riot police uniforms arrived.” The other 30 officials were from the Samarkand regional tax authorities, Fire Brigade, Sanitary-Epidemiological Department, and the regional administration.
The raid began at 11 am in the morning and those in police uniforms “began brandishing their rubber batons, and collected statements from everyone – even from small children from their parents”. After six hours of questioning, the police took all nine adults and 22 children from the camp to Mironkul Police Station for further questioning before eventually releasing them.
The officials also confiscated two laptop computers, four mobile phones, a Yamaha electric guitar, a Toshiba overhead projector, a Canon camera, one sound amplifier, one speaker, one microphone, an internet modem, four memory chips, as well as two New Testaments in Uzbek, 10 private notebooks, and four posters.

After releasing the camp participants, police raided the private homes in Samarkand itself of the four adults the police consider to have organised the camp: Damir Hojaev, Eldor Muzapparov, Farida Hojaeva and Gulshan Kamalova.
From Hojaev’s home the police confiscated two Christian books, including a personal Uzbek-language New Testament, two magazines, a laptop computer, and a copier machine.
From Muzapparov’s home the police confiscated a desktop computer, 19 Christian books, including a personal Uzbek-language New Testament, 10 private notebooks, 62 leaflets with words of wisdom from the Bible, 52 CD and DVD disks of various fiction movies and video clips openly available in Uzbekistan.
From Hojaeva’s home police confiscated 78 Christian books, including a personal Russian-language Bible and New Testament in Uzbek, and other books in Uzbek, Russian and English.
From Kamalova’s home police confiscated a desktop computer, 18 Christian books, including a personal Russian-language Bible, 2 Uzbek language New Testaments.

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