Rescuing and serving persecuted Christians since 1995
Select Page

ICC Note:
Christians in the former Soviet Republic countries such as Kazakhstan, Uzbekistan and Kyrgyzstan suffer persecution daily. This article refers to them as “secret believers” as many times they must keep their faith quiet due to the danger it could incur to be vocal about their belief in Jesus. One Christians said, “It’s practically impossible to openly share about Jesus Christ. Doing so will get you beaten, arrested, or killed.”
By George Thomas
06/26/2013 Kyrgyzstan (CBN)- One-hundred-thousand Christians are murdered because of their faith each year. In many cases, governments are to blame because they pass laws that restrict religious freedom.
Recently, CBN News gained exclusive access to a gathering of secret believers inside a former Soviet Republic to get a close-up look at what life is like for Christians who face daily persecution.
Secret Strategy
The setting in the mountains of Kyrgyzstan could not have been more ideal.
“This is a beautiful location,” Vitaly, a secret believer, said. “Seventy percent of the country is mountainous. Locals call it the second Switzerland of Asia. Our goal was to find a safe place away from the city to not draw attention of the authorities.”
For a few days Vitaly and a handful of Christians gathered in a secluded villa tucked away in the mountains about a two-hour drive outside the capital city Bishkek.
“We worship, pray, and strategize how to effectively share the love of Christ in our countries,” Vitaly said.
CBN News cannot show you their faces or reveal their real names for security reasons, but in a room inside a secret getaway are underground believers from Kyrgyzstan, Uzbekistan, Kazakhstan and Tajikistan. All are former Soviet Republics in Central Asia experiencing a rising tide of hostilities against believers.
They are members of a Christian ministry that’s reaching young people in the former Soviet Union.
“It’s practically impossible to openly share about Jesus Christ. Doing so will get you beaten, arrested, or killed,” Vitaly warned.
Youth Not Allowed
But that has not stopped Marat, a youth leader from Uzbekistan, who said last year was a difficult year for him.
“Fortunately I wasn’t arrested,” Marat said. “But I was repeatedly interrogated by secret police accused of gathering people in my house. They said what I am doing is illegal.”
Marat runs an informal Christian school training Uzbek leaders. He told CBN News that “the pressure is unrelenting.”
“You can’t relax. You are constantly under stress,” he said. “You cannot trust anyone because you don’t know if they’ll turn you in or accuse you of proselytizing.”

[Full Story]