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1/24/11 China (MNN) –  When the Israelites left Egypt, they wandered in the desert for 40 years, until the generation that left forgot the safety of the bondage they were rescued from.

In many ways, the Chinese church is experiencing the same phenomenon. Erik Burklin with China Partner explains, “Chinese that are living in the United States and in Canada came to our country to get away from Communism, to get away from the Cultural Revolution, to get away from oppression and all that.”

But there’s a movement of the younger generation to go back to its roots and nurture the growing church in mainland China. “I just came back from a China conference in Vancouver where there were 2,000 Chinese Christians at this year-end conference. Half of them were young people under 25.”

As the years of the Cultural Revolution fade into memory, the scars fade from current history. The younger generation isn’t hobbled by the nightmares of persecution their parents and grandparents lived through. “They’re much more open-minded to doing God’s work, in a legal way, in China.” 

This paradigm shift presents an interesting scenario. Burklin says, “This is the generation now that is still ethnic Chinese, but lives in North America. Now, they’re growing up and realizing, ‘Okay, God has put a heartbeat of mission in my heart. What can I do?'”

They’re going home. Although they are American-born Chinese, they have strong cultural ties to China…there’s a heritage and a family tradition they’ve been told about, but they never lived on the soil. That’s why China Partner is coming alongside. “We’re now coining this new phrase, ‘By the Chinese, for the Chinese.’ What we mean by that is that we want to use more Chinese brothers and sisters, Chinese churches in North America to partner with us to minister to the Chinese in mainland China.”

Burklin explains that without a language barrier, communication of ideas is much more efficient. “We really are trying to attract young pastors who speak Mandarin from North American Chinese churches as guest trainers, as guest lecturers so to speak, to conduct the training.”

The Israelites wandered in the desert for a generation, not only to forget its bondage, but also to draw closer to God. In much the same way, China’s church is following the footprints left by Israel’s journey.

China (MNN) ? When the Israelites left Egypt, they wandered in the desert for 40 years, until the generation that left forgot the safety of the bondage they were rescued from.

In many ways, the Chinese church is experiencing the same phenomenon. Erik Burklin with China Partner explains, “Chinese that are living in the United States and in Canada came to our country to get away from Communism, to get away from the Cultural Revolution, to get away from oppression and all that.”

But there’s a movement of the younger generation to go back to its roots and nurture the growing church in mainland China. “I just came back from a China conference in Vancouver where there were 2,000 Chinese Christians at this year-end conference. Half of them were young people under 25.”

As the years of the Cultural Revolution fade into memory, the scars fade from current history. The younger generation isn’t hobbled by the nightmares of persecution their parents and grandparents lived through. “They’re much more open-minded to doing God’s work, in a legal way, in China.” 

This paradigm shift presents an interesting scenario. Burklin says, “This is the generation now that is still ethnic Chinese, but lives in North America. Now, they’re growing up and realizing, ‘Okay, God has put a heartbeat of mission in my heart. What can I do?'”

They’re going home. Although they are American-born Chinese, they have strong cultural ties to China…there’s a heritage and a family tradition they’ve been told about, but they never lived on the soil. That’s why China Partner is coming alongside. “We’re now coining this new phrase, ‘By the Chinese, for the Chinese.’ What we mean by that is that we want to use more Chinese brothers and sisters, Chinese churches in North America to partner with us to minister to the Chinese in mainland China.”

Burklin explains that without a language barrier, communication of ideas is much more efficient. “We really are trying to attract young pastors who speak Mandarin from North American Chinese churches as guest trainers, as guest lecturers so to speak, to conduct the training.”

The Israelites wandered in the desert for a generation, not only to forget its bondage, but also to draw closer to God. In much the same way, China’s church is following the footprints left by Israel’s journey.

 …

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