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‘No quick fix’ in Sudan , says World Council of Churches leader

ICC Note

“We give thanks for that. It is great pleasure that our brothers in different parts of the world are still remembering us,”

By Fredrick Nzwili

April 4, 2008 South Sudan (ENI). One of the lessons that a delegation of church leaders has learnt from a recent visit to Sudan is that after 21 years of civil war, there is “no quick fix” available for Africa’s biggest country, says the Rev. Samuel Kobia, general secretary of the World Council of Churches.

Sudan is a place where Islam meets Christianity, as well as where the Arab meets black Africans, Kobia said.

The majority of the estimated 39 million people of Sudan are Muslim, with Christians amounting to about 17 percent, and with another 10 percent followers of African traditional religions. While the northern part of the country is predominantly Muslim, the southern part is mainly Christian.

“This is the biggest solidarity visit the council has ever carried out to any country,” Kobia told his Sudanese hosts. “We hope this is a clear message that we are at your disposal.”

The [Anglican] Episcopal Church of Sudan archbishop-elect, Daniel Deng, told the delegates that over the past 21 years the church in Sudan had never been left alone.

“We give thanks for that. It is great pleasure that our brothers in different parts of the world are still remembering us,” said Deng.

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