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A Slaves Tale
The testimony of Simon Deng

My name is Simon Aban Deng. I am from Sudan . I am a Shiluk by tribe. I am a Christian by religion. I belong to a people who have been subjected to mass murder, slavery, systematic rape, religious persecution, enforced starvation, dislocation, exile. We are the victims of genocide, both physical and cultural. We have been targeted for annihilation as human beings and as members of a culture. These miseries did not fall upon us from the sky; we have been and remain the victims of the radical jihadist regime in Khartoum .
The scale of our losses has been enormous in the two genocides perpetrated by the Islamists – two, not one. Starting in 1955, the year before independence was granted by the British, up until 1973, 1.5 million Southern Sudanese Christians were slaughtered by the Arab/Muslim dominated government in Khartoum . From 1983 until just 3 months ago when a peace treaty was brokered by the United States, we Southern Sudanese lost 2 million more to what Khartoum calls a holy war against the infidels. Yes, I am an infidel according to their definition. I think many of you are as well. We black “infidels” in the South, Christians and other non-Muslims, refused to be ruled by Islam, and we refused to be Arabized.
Our only offense was our determination to remain faithful to our religion and to honor our African cultures. For these “crimes” The National Islamic Front regime has committed genocide against us. Not only has that genocide produced the largest body-count of murdered innocents since the Nazis and the work of Joseph Stalin’s followers, but it has also produced the largest population of refugees anywhere on earth since the Second World War.”

“I am standing before you today, ladies and gentlemen, a victim of Sudanese Arab enslavement in Sudan . I was a slave. I am not ashamed to say it. When I was nine year’s old, my village was raided by Arab troops in the pay of Khartoum . As we ran into the bush to escape I watched as childhood friends were shot dead and the old and the weak who were unable to run were burned alive in their huts. I was abducted and given to an Arab family as a “gift.” A “gift,” ladies and gentlemen. When you look at me, do you see a gift? Do I look like an object or a commodity? I am a human being, a person created in the image of God, a simple truth the jihadists did not and can not recognize.”

“The jihadists in Khartoum have a great challenge in Sudan , the Land of the Blacks. Those Arabs and Sudanese who have chosen to be culturally Arab are so comparatively few – and the blacks are so many. Still, they have done their work with great efficiency. They have been well-armed by their friends in the Arab world. They committed genocide against us in the South and they got away with it: the world simply looked away. Now they have turned their attention west, to Darfur. Some are watching; most are not.”

“Finally, let me turn to address Muslim believers. Surely you know the enslavement and slaughter of millions of people is evil. Does your religion condone these crimes against humanity? If it does not, why don’t you speak up to condemn these crimes, these sins? The genocide and slavery perpetrated by the government of Khartoum is done in the name of the ideology of jihad. Thus, these crimes appear to be committed, by implication, in your name, in the name of the religion you hold sacred.”

“There are 2-3 million Southern Sudanese refugees in another part of Sudan where they are treated like dogs; they are not even considered citizens because in Sudan citizenship is based on religion, and only Muslims qualify. The laws relating to citizenship rights place the nation’s black African Christians at the bottom, in legal limbo without status or rights. Muslim men are first-class citizens. The second–class citizens of the Sudan are Arab Muslim men from any other Islamic country, and the third-class citizens are the Arab Muslim women. The infidel Africans of that nation are not considered by jihadists to be full citizens; this despite the fact that nearly 90% of the population is black African.”

“I direct these last words principally to the United Nations. Do you stand for all human rights? Do you stand for all human liberties? Do you care about the dignity of all of the people of the world, including those branded by jihadists as infidels? The questions I have asked are repeated every single day by millions of black Sudanese. Can you answer me?The failure of the United Nations to guarantee the basic rights of the slaves of Sudan and other black African “infidels” is shameful beyond my ability to express.”