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ICC Note

With a continued crackdown against Christians in China , these new internet regulations inhibit people from receiving persecution news. Any information that is deemed “against the state” will not be viewed, further threatening Christians for their beliefs.

China Recruits Virtual Police to Regulate Internet Usage

By Jennifer Riley

Christian Today (01/25/06)

To view the full story, click here: China Recruits Virtual Police to Regulate Internet Usage

A new internet tool was launched in China to tighten regulation on ‘‘sensitive’’ internet content, further threatening the ability of Chinese internet users to access information.

In Shenzhen, a city in southern China closest to Hong Kong, virtual police officers have been assigned by Shenzhen Public Security Bureau’s Internet Surveillance Division to patrol cyberspace, reported the state media China Daily newspaper last Tuesday.

On Jan. 2, the images of the “Shenzhen Internet Police” – a male police officer named “Jingjing” and a female officer named “Chacha” – officially went online for the first time in China.

China recently implemented new laws restricting information posted on the Internet in September 2005 by the China’s State Council Information Office and the Ministry of Information Industry. China claimed that these new laws were established to “protect the interest of the state.”

Among the content restricted or prohibited from being posted on the internet is religious news criticising the government – such as persecution news – and political contents the Chinese government considers sensitive. Banned political content include explicit or implicit criticism of the ruling Communist Party.

To read the full story, click here: China Recruits Virtual Police to Regulate Internet Usage