Restoration of Karamles Encourages Displaced Christians to Return

ICC Note: Father Thabet, a Karamles priest, is hopeful that the rebuilding efforts in his hometown will encourage Christians to return. Karamles was an overwhelmingly Christian town that was destroyed by ISIS, forcing many of its citizens to evacuate. Father Thabet estimates that 300 Christian families have since returned, and he is hopeful that 250 families will soon come home.

03/06/2018 Iraq (Christian Post) – Father Thabet Habib could have never imagined the situation he and others from his destroyed hometown of Karamles, Iraq, are facing when he first began serving as a priest at the end of 2011.

About two-and-a-half years later, the priest would be the last person from the town of over 850 Christian families to flee when the Islamic State conquered much of Mosul and the surrounding Nineveh Plains and threatened to kill Christians if they didn’t convert to Islam.

Like hundreds of thousands of others, Habib took shelter in Erbil, Iraq, where he was called to be a servant to not only his hometown neighbors but also some of the world’s most vulnerable displaced people.

After the town’s liberation by Iraqi-led coalition forces in October 2016, Habib was among the first to return. He knew what to expect but was still horrified by what he found upon his arrival.

“Many houses were burned and destroyed,” Habib, who leads the committee in charge of coordinating efforts to rebuild of the town, told The Christian Post in a recent interview. “Of 756 houses, we had 241 burned houses, 112 houses destroyed completely, and other houses were partially damaged.”

Among the destroyed homes was Habib’s childhood home.

IS militants turned the home into a center for launching mortars at coalition and Kurdish forces, Habib said. The home was destroyed by a coalition airstrike.

“We are very happy for this liberation because it is our home. We were waiting for this moment. But when we arrived at Karamles, the reality was very, very hard,” Habib explained. “The destruction was everywhere in the village — infrastructure, churches, cemetery, houses. Some houses were damaged 10 percent and others were damaged 100 percent.”

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